Tag Archives: Washington

Tree Geometry In The Sol Duc Valley, Olympic National Park

OLYM_RebeccaLatson-2285-2_Scenery Along The North Fork Sol Duc Trail

I can remember when photographing a forest was sort of an afterthought. Now, I love walking into the forests to photograph the myriad shades of green, the different patterns and textures, and perhaps, if I am lucky, to capture the inner glow of a forest.

The forests of Sol Duc are old growth. They are different from the mossy rain forests of the Hoh and Quinault in that they are taller – or, at least, they stand straighter, like toothpicks – and it’s a bit drier in the Sol Duc. That’s not to say there isn’t moss coating the trees, because there is, just not as much, I think.

I was heading out of the Sol Duc and on to Lake Crescent when I stopped to photograph the Sol Duc River. I spied some interesting scenes within the shadowed interior of the forest across the road and noticed there was a trail – the North Fork Sol Duc River Trail, I believe. So I took my tripod and camera and set up on different portions of the trail to photograph the tall trees and green fern-carpeted forest floor.

A tripod is the best way to photograph the shadowy forest interior. That way, you can use a low ISO (200) and a slower shutter speed (5 sec) while keeping your aperture relatively small (f/9).

I would imagine that with the onset of fall, things are probably getting a little wetter out there now. I think I went at just the right time.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 24-105mm, 5DS, Canon, Canon Lens, forest, National Parks, Olympic National Park, Photography, Seasons, summer, Travel, Washington State

Kalaloch Beach Afterglow

Kalaloch Beach Afterglow

I was so darned tickled with myself for staying up and capturing the summer sunset on this beach while I was there. I was still wide awake and decided to stick around a little longer. I had a feeling there will continue to be some sort of light show as the sun produced a “last hurrah” of color, and I was right.

I needed my camera on tripod in order to open up the shutter and let the light in. Because the shutter was slower, I might have shaken things up for a blurry photo if I’d handheld the camera. Besides, the slower shutter speed meant the water in Kalaloch Creek (what you see below) would become more “silky.”
 
The moral of this story is that you should always stay a little longer after sunset. You’ll either get an afterglow like you see here, or you’ll at least photograph the coming of the “blue hour.”
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 5DSR, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, National Parks, Olympic National Park, Photography, Seasons, summer, sunset, Travel, Washington State

The Difference Between A Summer Morning And A Summer Sunset

A Morning View Of Ruby BeachA Sunset View Of Ruby Beach

The Difference Between A Summer Morning And A Summer Sunset
Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park, Washington

I’ve hammered this in to my National Parks Traveler readers as well as you, I know, but visiting a place more than once, during different times of the day, during different seasons, and/or under different weather conditions can really make a difference in what you see through your camera’s viewfinder.

The first shot was taken around 8:30 a.m. PST. I was just too tired to get up to get a sunrise and I already knew that coastal sunrises along the Olympic Peninsula – at least when staring out in the direction of the sea – are lovely, but not dramatic (at least, not during the time I was there). Sunsets, on the other hand, are spectacular and I’d already gotten sunset shots on two different days at Kalaloch Beach, so I wanted to get a sunset image or two (or a bunch) at a beach with some interesting topography to it. I’d captured images of the actual sunset, and the tide was coming in, so I decided to hike back up the trail to the parking lot. I’d gotten up two-thirds of the way, turned around, and saw the sky an incredible pink-orange color, so I dropped everything and handheld the camera for this shot, taken almost exactly 12 hours later, at 8:32 P.M. PST. That tall piece of rock you see is called Abbey Island.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 5DSR, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, Landscape, National Parks, Olympic National Park, Photography, Seasons, summer, sunset, Travel, Washington State

The Bridge Over July Creek

The Bridge Over July Creek

When I visited Olympic National Park this past January 2019, the government shutdown was still in force, and the park entrance to the Hoh Rainforest was closed and blockaded due to heavy debris on the road with no ranger service to clean it up. I was aching to see some park rainforest (and wanted to get photos for my National Parks Traveler articles), so I drove south of Kalaloch about 27 miles to enter the park portion of the Quinault Rainforest. Not too far along the road after entering is a parking lot for a picnic area and short loop trail over July Creek. Nobody else was there that damp, moody morning, so I had the place to myself. I spent quite awhile photographing the creek and the greenery around it, just from my vantage point on that bridge in the photo. After a bit, I moved off and turned my camera and tripod toward the bridge. I also used the “silky water” technique to make the creek water look satiny. For those of you who might want to try this technique for yourself, you should have either a polarizer filter or a neutral density filter on your lens. Set your camera on a tripod and experiment with slow shutter speeds while keeping everything else set for good exposure. The dark tint of the filter allows you to smooth out the water while preventing overexposure of everything else.

I will be bypassing the Quinault Rainforest for my next Olympic National Park trip (which I start tomorrow), so I’m glad I was able to visit this particular area of the park earlier in the year.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under Canon, forest, Landscape, National Parks, nature, Olympic National Park, Photography, Seasons, Travel, Washington State, winter

Ferns, Moss, Tree Trunks and Inner Glow

Ferns Moss And Tree Trunks
I’m pretty much all packed for my Olympic National Park trip. The camera batteries are charged. All I need to do now is pack up the cameras and lenses. Since I’m taking my own car, this means I can have that “kitchen sink” mentality and take whatever I want, because it’s better to have it and not need it, as opposed to needing it and not having it.
 
The thing about this national park’s rainforests is that there are so many different shades of green and so many different leaves and plants. And,there’s that sort of “glow” within the forest interior. It can be difficult to capture on digital “film,” but when you do, it’s something to be very pleased over.
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

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Filed under 5DS, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, National Parks, nature, Olympic National Park, Photography, Seasons, Travel, Washington State, winter

Your Armchair Photography Guide To The North Cascades Complex

Blue Green And Gray

Scenery in the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, North Cascades Complex

It’s been awhile since I last penned an Armchair Photography Guide. I write these guides for those people who can’t or don’t wish to hike way out in the backcountry to get beautiful images of a national park they visit. While I am an SLR gal, myself, I know there are those out there who are happy with their smartphones or point-and-shoots, so I write these guides with that (mostly) in mind, since I truly want people to get beautiful shots of their national park adventure.

This latest guide is of the North Cascades Complex in Washington state. To read the article, click on the photo above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Armchair Photography Guide, Canon, Canon Lens, Equipment, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, North Cascades, North Cascades Complex, North Cascades National Park, Photography, Ross Lake National Recreation Area, Travel, Washington State

One Year Ago Today

  • I drove across the Washington State border from Idaho, 3 weeks after moving up from TX.
  • I arrived in Yakima, WA, my new home, that morning.
  • My then 71-year old sister discovered (on this same day) her (thankfully now-ex) husband of 21 years had stolen – over the course of 10 years – all but $31,000 of her $800,000 retirement fund. Had he not been found out, he would have probably totally emptied her account – HER personal account that was never his to begin with.

Not quite how I’d expected my move to the Pacific Northwest to end up, but I sure am happy I’m here. I live with my sister now, help with the yardwork (see photos below), help with the cooking, help with the errands, and help with the bills. I live in a valley with soil perfect for fruit orchards, vinyards, and vegetable farms, near wineries and whisky distilleries (Lake Chelan Blue Spirits bourbon is my fave). I don’t have to worry about tornados, hurricanes every 6 months, or flooding. I don’t have to deal with humidity, and there are actual real seasons over here, along with cool weather that occurs BEFORE late December and lasts longer than a month. I am within driving distance of three national parks and a plethora of other beautiful landscapes to photograph, from the Cascade Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. The geology is pretty cool around here, too.

 

The year has gone by so fast, and it’s taken a little, but not much, adjustment on all our parts. I feel needed and am glad to be helping my sister – I feel like I am paying it forward for things I should have done for Mom but didn’t.

 

The House BEFOREBecky And The House

Before and After shots of the yard. Looks pretty nice, huh? This is what my sister and I, with help from her youngest son, did – something that should have been done by my sister’s ex, instead of what he really was doing, which was sitting in his office downstairs thinking up ways to continue stealing from her.

No, I haven’t won the lottery nor am I working for any high-powered company here. I’m definitely not independently wealthy, but I sure feel like I am finally living the dream. When my parents and I moved down South when I was 9 years old (my father had a better job offer in Kentucky), I watched the mountains of Montana (where I was born) recede behind me and vowed I would eventually return. It’s taken me 49 years to finally get back to the West, but better late than never. 😁

Anniversary Becky 2

Becky at Home

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Filed under Attitude, Life, love, National Parks, Photography, Washington State