Tag Archives: trees

A Quiet Lake In Yellowstone

A Quiet Glassy Lake In Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park is such a large park, and so much more than geysers and wildlife. Really. Sure, all of us who visit this place get the iconic shots – well, if there is parking. And of course, it goes without saying, wildlife shots are always a draw. But, if you are in Yellowstone, even for just a day, try not to overwhelm yourself with trying to get those geyser and bison/wolf/bear shots. You might not be able to, you know. Instead, concentrate on what you observe around you, like this lovely little lake I saw through the trees shortly after entering the south entrance of the park. This image is also a nice example (although I didn’t do it deliberately), of a leading line, where the glassine waters and shoreline reflections lead the eye from the front of the image, to the back. This vertical shot also looks much better for that leading line effect than the horizontal one I also captured.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

 

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Filed under Landscape, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, summer, Travel, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone Layers

Yellowstone Layers

Layers of grass, trees, rock and mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Whenever someone mentions Yellowstone National Park, you probably picture either Old Faithful or other geysers, colorful thermal springs like Grand Prismatic, or some type of wildlife, close up. What you may not think about are all the other landscapes, textures, colors and patterns that make up this huge national park.
 
While I was driving from Tower Junction over to Upper Geyser Basin, I looked over and saw the tall, bare trees first. After I parked, I took a longer look and saw all the colorful layers of trees, rocks, and distant rolling mountains. Yellowstone is huge, covering 3,472 square miles (2,221,766 acres). That area covers quite a bit of different landscapes, such as this one.
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Landscape, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, summer, Travel, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

A Low-Key Sunrise

A Low-Key Sunrise At Sunrise Point

Here’s a low-key sunrise at Sunrise Point in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, to help most of you start out what might be a rather low-key start to your work week after a long Labor Day weekend.

I captured this image during my July return visit to this national park. I was planning on hiking a part of the Fairyland Loop Trail down to Tower Bridge, so decided this would be a good opportunity to get there pre-dawn and photograph a summer version of sunrise. I like to re-visit favorite places in national parks during different times of the year, because the angle of the sun changes from season to season. On this particular day, however, the sunrise way to my left was hidden behind some clouds, so while the landscape and morning were both still lovely, the light from the sunrise was rather muted.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon, National Parks, Photography, sunrise, Travel, Utah

Jenny Lake Scenery

Jenny Lake Scenery

There’s a reason Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, is so popular. That area possesses some stunning forest and mountain scenery, which I photographed while taking a short walk along the popular trail encompassing Jenny Lake.

Speaking of Grand Teton, the season for berries is now, and humans are allowed to pick berries in this park. Of course, there are regulations as well as harvesting devices which are prohibited, not to mention the fact that the bears are out after those berries, as well.

If you want to know more, click on this link to the article in the National Parks Traveler: https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/…/grand-teton-park-vi…

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under Canon, Grand Teton National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, Wyoming

Sometimes It Pays To Listen To That Little Voice Inside Your Head

6225_Becky and Her Rental Fiat

Sometimes, you need to listen to that little voice  inside your head.  Usually, I don’t, but today, I did.  And I’m glad.

Day 3 of my Washington State vacation saw me heading toward the Longmire entrance to Mt. Rainier National Park.  I had a reservation for two nights at the National Park Inn.  I love staying in historic park lodges.  No, they aren’t 5-star hotels – they are very basic with no bells or whistles and usually no television or phone and definitely no internet service.  But, they are always rich with park history.

April means The Mountain still has quite a bit of snow, making access to many places difficult to well nigh impossible.  I’d already stayed at the Paradise Lodge, so I figured staying someplace a little lower in elevation would allow me to hike around without having to resort to cross-country skis (back in the day, I loved downhill skiing, but was a terrible alpine skier).

Naturally, I arrived at the National Park Inn way too early for  check-in, having left my Seattle hotel around 7AM that morning (it only takes 2 hours to get to the Longmire entrance).  So, I figured I’d try to drive up to the Paradise area to see how it looked covered with snow; I’d visited during the fall, when the huckleberry bushes were brilliant oranges and reds, and the sky was a deep, dark blue.

The best adjective I have to describe the day is: “bleak”.  The sky was a hazy white.  The cloud cover was high enough in altitude to not hide Mt. Rainer and surrounding mountains, but basically, the scenery was white on white, with a little bit of dark from the treeline and the rocks sticking out of the snow.

I realized I was fighting an uphill battle when my attempt to hike to Narada Falls was a total bust before even leaving the parking lot.  The snow level reached above my head and I had no snow shoes (perhaps I should invest in a pair, although I do live in southeast Texas where snow shoes do nothing but make for an interesting wall decoration).  Then, I heard a little voice inside my head telling me to head back down in elevation, away from the hues of white, and toward the multitudinous hues of green deep within the shadowy forest.

So, I did.

I parked, pulled out my tripod and cameras, set things up, then just stood there.

And listened.

The forest is still and silent, yet alive with the sounds of nature:  birdsong, wind blowing through the trees, the creak of the trees as they bend in the wind, the drip of moisture from the leaves to the ground, the flow of water from countless meltwater springs and rivulets.

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5030_Running Water

5041_Running Water

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I captured images I would not have thought to photograph had I not listened to that little inner voice telling me to leave the white-on-white.

5005_Forest Greens

94C1098_Moss

94C1117_Green Encrusted Log

94C1133_Moss Greens

94C1150_Tall Trees and Many Greens

5010_Mossy Arms

Do yourself a favor – listen occasionally to that little voice inside your head because it may well lead you to the best images of the day.

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Filed under Mt. Rainier National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, Travel and Photography, Vacation