Tag Archives: hiking

Getting Close To The Edge

Getting Closer To The Edge

Close to the edge at Scouts Lookout, Zion National Park, Utah

There have been more than a few times when I’ve gotten “close to the edge,” but that’s been a 9-to-5 work thing as opposed to literally being close to the edge as in this shot.

I have a fear of heights. Of course, this generally doesn’t stop me, as you can see in this photo; when I am focused on photography, my fear dissipates. However, this mild acrophobia gives me a healthy awareness of my abilities and limitations, since I have rheumatoid arthritis and also am not the most sure-footed of creatures. In this instance, I stopped at Scouts Lookout and did NOT finish that last .5 mile to Angels Landing. I knew my physical limitations (mental ones, too) and knew I could not go any further with all the stuff I was lugging with me. And I was (and am) totally fine with that. I still remember my legs shaking just a little bit, from both the uphill climb as well as the fact that the rocks tilt a little bit in the Scouts Lookout area and it’s a lonnnnnng way down. Heck, I was thrilled I’d made it that far, having come from sea level elevation 2 days prior.

Moral of the story:  you may not always be able to (or want to) reach the very end, for whatever reason, but that doesn’t mean you can’t come away with some cool experiences/photography along the way there and back.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under National Parks, Photography, Travel, Utah, Zion National Park

Hiking The Trail And Leaving No Trace

Hiking The Trail

One of today’s newly-published articles in the National Parks Traveler is titled “Leave No Trace This Summer As You Explore The Outdoors.” This article reminded me of this image that I had just reworked, so I thought I’d post it along with the advice to leave no trace and pack in what you pack out. Is it possible to really leave no trace? Well, go read the article in the Traveler to find out.

This image was taken 10 years ago, during the very first photo workshop I’d ever taken, using one of my very first full-frame cameras (Canon 5D). The workshop took place in Glacier National Park, Montana and – while a bit strenuous in terms of hiking for my tastes and physical capabilities – was a worthwhile event that led me to continue joining up in other photo tours and workshops (yes, there is a slight difference between the two and I actually wrote an article about it in the National Parks Traveler back in 2014).

This image is looking back on part of the trail from St. Mary Falls leading onward to Virginia Falls.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 24-105mm, 5D, Canon, Canon Lens, Equipment, Glacier National Park MT, Montana, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel, Travel and Photography

Happy Earth Day 2018!

Watching The Sunrise

Happy Earth Day to you, this April 22nd, 2018.  I feel like I experience Earth Day every time I visit a national park.  On this occasion, I was up with scads of other people at Sunrise Point in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, watching:  the sunrise.

 

 

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Filed under 5DS, 5DSR, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon, Canon Lens, Geology, Landscape, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, Spring, sunrise, Travel, Utah, Utah

Ready For Adventure!

Ready For Adventure

Not trying to be political here, folks. Before the 25th, I usually wish people Happy Holidays. On the 25th, I wish them Merry Christmas. And to show that I also appreciate globalism, I wish you not only a Merry Christmas but a Joyeux Noel, Feliz Navidad, Frohe Weihnachten, and Buon Natale. I’d do the wishing in Japanese, Korean and Chinese, too, but I don’t have the keyboard for it.

Anyway, you get my point. I hope everybody has a great day, today, no matter whether you celebrate the holiday or not. And, start planning for some great adventures for 2018. I know I’m going to!

 

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Filed under 5DSR, Canon, Canon Lens, Christmas, Holidays, Photography

Knowing My Limits and Learning A Lesson Along Petroglyph Trail

C2C7465_Park Point Sunrise

My last full day inside Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado, began with a spectacular sunrise and continued with a lesson learned.

Because vacations for people like me (a technical support person who has managed to work at the same place long enough to earn 4 weeks of vacation….out of 52 weeks of the year)  usually aren’t more than maybe 10-11 days at a stretch (the company would have heart failure if I wanted to take a full two weeks or more off at one time), I generally cram as much activity into each day as I possibly can.  Now, I have learned through the years not to push myself – I’m a little overweight, a lot out of shape, and currently reside in a part of Texas with an elevation of 30 feet.  Mesa Verde NP has  a general elevation of 7000 feet.  On one of the cliff dwelling tours I took, the ranger mentioned that it takes about 3 weeks for a body to acclimate itself to a much higher elevation.  I’d been there what?  Three days?

So, I planned a single tour every day I was in the park (4 full days plus the half day upon my arrival).  Ok, one day I had two tours, but who’s counting?  It worked well.  I’d be pleasantly tired, with the good feeling of having gotten my exercise and accomplishing what I wanted to do and see for that day.

On this last day, my goal was to take the Petroglyph Rock hike. I really wanted to see those ancient Puebloan rock carvings.   It’s just 2.8-miles round trip…..2.8 miles of narrow, primitive, rocky, STEEP, rocky (did I mention that already?) trail.  Had I not pulled a calf muscle a couple of days prior, and had I not been a dumb ass and brought along my backpack with extra camera, and extra water (in addition to the heavy camera around my neck, and the water bottle in one of my camera vest pockets), I might have made it through the hike.  Maybe…..

B5A6310_Photographers Shadow

When I started out, I met a worker who was thinning the brush alongside the trail.  He warned me of a black bear sighting between markers 20-22 (there are 34 trail markers along that particular hike).

Ok folks, pretty much every single photographer I have ever met would sell their soul to photograph a  bear in the wild.

Not I.

I have seen first hand just what a bear’s claws can do to human flesh; one of my bosses in a previous life had been attacked by a grizzly and I not only heard his story, but also read the news clippings (and saw the photos) of his injuries.  Bears make me verrrry nervous.  Especially if I am hiking alone.  I know several photographers who hike solo who have no problems with bears, and maybe they won’t ever have any problems.  All I know is that I don’t want to meet up with one by myself.

There I was,  talking loudly to myself, huffing and puffing and slowly taking all those steep areas and squeezing through those tight passages (you know the kind: sheer cliff face on one side and volkswagon-sized  boulder on the other).  Then, my calf muscle twinged and I felt a short, sharp stab of pain.  Uh oh.  I was already nervous about the bear, and now this.

After negotiating a particularly steep, narrow climb, at marker 17, I decided enough was enough.  I still have Arches National Park to visit during this vacation, and more than anything, I want to see Delicate Arch for myself.  Hmmm.  Such a choice.  Continue on that effing trail to see rock carvings, or rest up in order to manage the hike to see Delicate Arch?

I turned back.

During my initial hike up there, my gut feeling was not good  – I have learned to trust my gut feeling more as I get older, and the more I hiked toward the carvings, the worse I began to feel – and this was not just a physical issue , but a psychic issue as well .  The moment I turned back, I felt a great relief wash over me.  No, I wasn’t the least bit disappointed that I hadn’t made it through the hike, and no, I didn’t feel like I’d failed at anything.  It was just one of those days.  They happen.

This feeling was reinforced when I met who I can only describe as an angel sent to help me understand the lesson at hand, in the form of a little German lady about my age or so,  wearing shorts, hiking boots, hat, and carrying walking poles.

“Did you manage to crawl over the boulder?”  she cheerfully asked.  Hmmm.  Which one?  I’d seen, hiked past, and squeezed between a lot of large boulders, but I had not yet needed to climb over one.

I explained to her my decision to turn back because of my calf muscle.  She smiled and nodded. “Yah, I do this hike every year, and every year, I begin to have more and more problems.  I may not be able to do this hike next year.”  She went on to explain to me that she comes out to the park and does a number of hikes during which she measures how she is feeling this time compared to the previous years.  I told her I was recognizing my own limits and she nodded vigorously.  We both laughed about at least getting some exercise on this day, and then went on our separate ways.  I just can’t imagine our meeting to have been a mere coincidence.

I do understand now that I have limits and I am learning what they are.  No matter how much I would like to be able to hike and scramble hither and yonder over multitudes of primitive trails like others my age can do, I simply cannot achieve that without some measure of pain, and at what cost?  It’s a Petroglyph Trail vs. Delicate Arch choice.

So, this vacation of mine is not only a photographic paradise, but now also a good learning lesson.  As a photographer, I find I am actually able to live within these limits and still capture awesome images without having to hike to the hinterlands if I cannot physically do so.  For those of you photographers out there who may have the same issues as I do, well, there ya go. Know your limits, abide by them, and have fun taking pictures within those limits.  It can be done. Smile

B5A6333_Tight Squeeze Up

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Filed under Attitude, Lessons, Life, Mesa Verde National Park, Pain, Travel