Tag Archives: forest

Jenny Lake Scenery

Jenny Lake Scenery

There’s a reason Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, is so popular. That area possesses some stunning forest and mountain scenery, which I photographed while taking a short walk along the popular trail encompassing Jenny Lake.

Speaking of Grand Teton, the season for berries is now, and humans are allowed to pick berries in this park. Of course, there are regulations as well as harvesting devices which are prohibited, not to mention the fact that the bears are out after those berries, as well.

If you want to know more, click on this link to the article in the National Parks Traveler: https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/…/grand-teton-park-vi…

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under Canon, Grand Teton National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, Wyoming

Hiking The Trail And Leaving No Trace

Hiking The Trail

One of today’s newly-published articles in the National Parks Traveler is titled “Leave No Trace This Summer As You Explore The Outdoors.” This article reminded me of this image that I had just reworked, so I thought I’d post it along with the advice to leave no trace and pack in what you pack out. Is it possible to really leave no trace? Well, go read the article in the Traveler to find out.

This image was taken 10 years ago, during the very first photo workshop I’d ever taken, using one of my very first full-frame cameras (Canon 5D). The workshop took place in Glacier National Park, Montana and – while a bit strenuous in terms of hiking for my tastes and physical capabilities – was a worthwhile event that led me to continue joining up in other photo tours and workshops (yes, there is a slight difference between the two and I actually wrote an article about it in the National Parks Traveler back in 2014).

This image is looking back on part of the trail from St. Mary Falls leading onward to Virginia Falls.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 24-105mm, 5D, Canon, Canon Lens, Equipment, Glacier National Park MT, Montana, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel, Travel and Photography

Focus On The Eyes – Focus On The Light

Portrait Of A Juvenile Yellow-Crowned Night Heron

I feel like I’ve struck gold this month!  In addition to my 3 Days in Big Bend article, the National Parks Traveler has published my regular monthly photography article.  Click on the photo to go to that article (and no, the photo above was not taken in a national park – it’s just all I had access to this morning as I post this blog).

 

 

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Filed under Canon, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography

Sometimes It Pays To Listen To That Little Voice Inside Your Head

6225_Becky and Her Rental Fiat

Sometimes, you need to listen to that little voice  inside your head.  Usually, I don’t, but today, I did.  And I’m glad.

Day 3 of my Washington State vacation saw me heading toward the Longmire entrance to Mt. Rainier National Park.  I had a reservation for two nights at the National Park Inn.  I love staying in historic park lodges.  No, they aren’t 5-star hotels – they are very basic with no bells or whistles and usually no television or phone and definitely no internet service.  But, they are always rich with park history.

April means The Mountain still has quite a bit of snow, making access to many places difficult to well nigh impossible.  I’d already stayed at the Paradise Lodge, so I figured staying someplace a little lower in elevation would allow me to hike around without having to resort to cross-country skis (back in the day, I loved downhill skiing, but was a terrible alpine skier).

Naturally, I arrived at the National Park Inn way too early for  check-in, having left my Seattle hotel around 7AM that morning (it only takes 2 hours to get to the Longmire entrance).  So, I figured I’d try to drive up to the Paradise area to see how it looked covered with snow; I’d visited during the fall, when the huckleberry bushes were brilliant oranges and reds, and the sky was a deep, dark blue.

The best adjective I have to describe the day is: “bleak”.  The sky was a hazy white.  The cloud cover was high enough in altitude to not hide Mt. Rainer and surrounding mountains, but basically, the scenery was white on white, with a little bit of dark from the treeline and the rocks sticking out of the snow.

I realized I was fighting an uphill battle when my attempt to hike to Narada Falls was a total bust before even leaving the parking lot.  The snow level reached above my head and I had no snow shoes (perhaps I should invest in a pair, although I do live in southeast Texas where snow shoes do nothing but make for an interesting wall decoration).  Then, I heard a little voice inside my head telling me to head back down in elevation, away from the hues of white, and toward the multitudinous hues of green deep within the shadowy forest.

So, I did.

I parked, pulled out my tripod and cameras, set things up, then just stood there.

And listened.

The forest is still and silent, yet alive with the sounds of nature:  birdsong, wind blowing through the trees, the creak of the trees as they bend in the wind, the drip of moisture from the leaves to the ground, the flow of water from countless meltwater springs and rivulets.

5017_Running Water

5030_Running Water

5041_Running Water

5050_Running Water

I captured images I would not have thought to photograph had I not listened to that little inner voice telling me to leave the white-on-white.

5005_Forest Greens

94C1098_Moss

94C1117_Green Encrusted Log

94C1133_Moss Greens

94C1150_Tall Trees and Many Greens

5010_Mossy Arms

Do yourself a favor – listen occasionally to that little voice inside your head because it may well lead you to the best images of the day.

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Filed under Mt. Rainier National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, Travel and Photography, Vacation

Glacier National Park, Montana – A Photologue: From Logan Pass to Siyeh Bend to St. Mary Falls

From Logan Pass Visitor Center, it’s all downhill….driving, that is.  The photography on the eastern side of the pass is just as stupendous as on the western side, if not moreso.

This image taken just a mile or so beyond the visitor center has special meaning for me – some 20+ years ago, I made my first trip back to the park since my family moved to Kentucky when I was 9 years old.  I of course only had a film camera, and I photographed this very same spot as you see below; years later, I uploaded the film version to my Flickr site, although the scanner didn’t do the image justice.  So when I returned to this spot in 2008, I just had to take another photo with my digital SLR.

Further down the way is a large-ish pullout across the road from Lunch Creek, a glacial cirque with a waterfall far up near the top and a bubbling creek flowing along roadside.  I don’t know where they got the name for this place, but as one friend remarked “it is a nice spot to rest and have lunch”.  When I photographed this image in 2008, the sun shone and the sky was blue.  In 2009, it was raining and the cirque was hidden by the cloud mist.

Just a little further down the road is the hairpin turn called Siyeh Bend (pronounced Sigh-yee by the locals).  There’s a much larger parking pullout there because it’s one of the trailheads for the Siyeh Pass hike, which forks off at one point onto the Piegan Pass Trail.

Looking toward Siyeh Bend and the mountains.

From whence I came: looking the opposite way of Siyeh Bend.

The scent of pine.

Onward toward the east, with a stop along the way to hike the short trail (maybe a mile or a little less) to St. Mary Falls.  This is an amazing falls with beautiful turquoise waters spilling out and down the St. Mary River.

Flowing downstream from the falls.

The trail to St. Mary Falls extends further to Virgina Falls.  Although I made it a little ways further along the trail, I never quite made it to Virginia Falls  during either of my visits to the park.

Next:  From Sunrift Gorge to St. Mary Lake

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Filed under Glacier National Park MT, National Parks, Photography, Travel and Photography