Tag Archives: Canon

The Open Road

Down The Basin Road

Twenty-one years ago, I moved from Washington State down to southeast Texas to be with my aging parents.  Found a job, found a nice (but old) apartment right next door to my parents, got really involved in photography and did a fair amount of traveling to see and photograph many neat things, thanks to the salary from that job.

I never really felt like Texas was home, though.  I was born in Montana; I’m a mountain gal.  I told Mom and Dad when I moved that I would never spend the rest of my life in Texas and ultimately, I would move back to the mountains.

In 2 days, I’ll be hitting the open road from southeast Texas *back* to Washington State.  I’m done with Texas.  And I’m pretty certain Texas is done with me; I am not a Texan.

My home is packed except for a few items that I’ll box up before the movers arrive.  I’ve scheduled all the disconnects.  I will have to return my ATT internet equipment (insert sad-face emoji).  I need to run a few other errands.  But, I’m ready!  My cameras are ready!  My car is ready – well, it should be ready after a tuneup, replacement of some things, new tires, and a new windshield (don’t ask, it’s one of those unforeseen things that happened the other day).

I have a road trip itinerary mapped that will take me almost 4 weeks to complete (provided nothing unforeseen occurs).  It will be like the 4-week vacations my family used to take in the camper every summer when I was a little girl.  I’m stopping at national parks I’ve never visited and a national park I have visited.  I’ll be seeing a couple of friends along the way, as well.  I’m calling this Becky’s Big Road Trip.

I’ll be taking you all along with me via my photos, so stay tuned.

The Road To The Desert

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Filed under Life, National Parks, Photography, Travel

Getting Close To The Edge

Getting Closer To The Edge

Close to the edge at Scouts Lookout, Zion National Park, Utah

There have been more than a few times when I’ve gotten “close to the edge,” but that’s been a 9-to-5 work thing as opposed to literally being close to the edge as in this shot.

I have a fear of heights. Of course, this generally doesn’t stop me, as you can see in this photo; when I am focused on photography, my fear dissipates. However, this mild acrophobia gives me a healthy awareness of my abilities and limitations, since I have rheumatoid arthritis and also am not the most sure-footed of creatures. In this instance, I stopped at Scouts Lookout and did NOT finish that last .5 mile to Angels Landing. I knew my physical limitations (mental ones, too) and knew I could not go any further with all the stuff I was lugging with me. And I was (and am) totally fine with that. I still remember my legs shaking just a little bit, from both the uphill climb as well as the fact that the rocks tilt a little bit in the Scouts Lookout area and it’s a lonnnnnng way down. Heck, I was thrilled I’d made it that far, having come from sea level elevation 2 days prior.

Moral of the story:  you may not always be able to (or want to) reach the very end, for whatever reason, but that doesn’t mean you can’t come away with some cool experiences/photography along the way there and back.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under National Parks, Photography, Travel, Utah, Zion National Park

Hiking The Trail And Leaving No Trace

Hiking The Trail

One of today’s newly-published articles in the National Parks Traveler is titled “Leave No Trace This Summer As You Explore The Outdoors.” This article reminded me of this image that I had just reworked, so I thought I’d post it along with the advice to leave no trace and pack in what you pack out. Is it possible to really leave no trace? Well, go read the article in the Traveler to find out.

This image was taken 10 years ago, during the very first photo workshop I’d ever taken, using one of my very first full-frame cameras (Canon 5D). The workshop took place in Glacier National Park, Montana and – while a bit strenuous in terms of hiking for my tastes and physical capabilities – was a worthwhile event that led me to continue joining up in other photo tours and workshops (yes, there is a slight difference between the two and I actually wrote an article about it in the National Parks Traveler back in 2014).

This image is looking back on part of the trail from St. Mary Falls leading onward to Virginia Falls.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 24-105mm, 5D, Canon, Canon Lens, Equipment, Glacier National Park MT, Montana, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel, Travel and Photography

Creating A Sunburst In Your Photos

Late Afternoon Sunstar At Sunset Point

How many of you have seen photos like this one, where the sun appears many-rayed?  It’s called a sunburst (aka starburst) and my article in today’s edition of the National Parks Traveler tells you what it is and how you can achieve one. Even if you don’t like the effect, you’ll still learn something about your camera’s manual settings.

Click on the photo above to be taken to the article.

 

 

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Filed under Arches National Park, Big Bend, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon, Equipment, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Photography In The National Parks, starbursts, Zion National Park

Nowhere To Grow But Up!

Some Ponderosa Pines Precarious Perch Atop A Hoodoo In Aqua Cany

During my April visit to Bryce Canyon National Park, I used my 100-400mm lens extensively to zoom in on features of the park that might otherwise be missed or, at the very least, little noticed in the broader scheme of things. Seeing all the ways the tree life adapted in order to continue growing never ceased to amaze me – especially since the process of erosion is a constant, ongoing process and what I see now may be gone thereafter.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM, Canon Lens, Photography, telephoto lens, Travel, Uncategorized

Twisted and Weathered With Time

Bent Over With Time

Feeling a little twisted and bent out of shape from the workweek? Never fear, the weekend is right around the corner (unless, of course, you have to work this weekend – in which case, try to weather through it) ):

This little tree – a bristlecone pine, I think – and it’s deep red-orange sandstone perch just off of the Zion-Mount Carmel Road in this national park – is rather famous. I’ve seen it in a number of images on Flickr. I saw it for the first time as I was returning to the Zion tunnel, after a photo op stop at Checkerboard Mesa. I would have missed this tree completely had I not turned my head at just the right time to look out over the landscape. This tree and sandstone knob called out to me and I found a pullout at which to park, then walked back along the road and out into the landscape to photograph different perspectives. Trees speak to me and this one was particularly verbose (grin).

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

 

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Filed under National Parks, nature, Photography, Travel, Utah, winter, Zion National Park

A National Park Road

The Morning View Along GTTS RoadA Steaming GTTS RoadGTTS Road From Highline Trail

Roads get us to and through the national parks we love to visit, like the Going-To-The-Sun road pictured here, that bisects the park from east to west (or west to east) and takes us through some of the finest mountain scenery in the Lower 48 (imho).

Speaking of roads, if you are of a mind to read the latest national park news, such as the coming opening of the Tioga Road in Yosemite National Park, or the latest explosive activity at Kilauea in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, or where you should pitch your tent or park your RV within a national park, then go on over to the National Parks Traveler and read all about it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Canon, Glacier National Park MT, Montana, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel