Category Archives: Canon

Hiking The Trail And Leaving No Trace

Hiking The Trail

One of today’s newly-published articles in the National Parks Traveler is titled “Leave No Trace This Summer As You Explore The Outdoors.” This article reminded me of this image that I had just reworked, so I thought I’d post it along with the advice to leave no trace and pack in what you pack out. Is it possible to really leave no trace? Well, go read the article in the Traveler to find out.

This image was taken 10 years ago, during the very first photo workshop I’d ever taken, using one of my very first full-frame cameras (Canon 5D). The workshop took place in Glacier National Park, Montana and – while a bit strenuous in terms of hiking for my tastes and physical capabilities – was a worthwhile event that led me to continue joining up in other photo tours and workshops (yes, there is a slight difference between the two and I actually wrote an article about it in the National Parks Traveler back in 2014).

This image is looking back on part of the trail from St. Mary Falls leading onward to Virginia Falls.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 24-105mm, 5D, Canon, Canon Lens, Equipment, Glacier National Park MT, Montana, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel, Travel and Photography

Creating A Sunburst In Your Photos

Late Afternoon Sunstar At Sunset Point

How many of you have seen photos like this one, where the sun appears many-rayed?  It’s called a sunburst (aka starburst) and my article in today’s edition of the National Parks Traveler tells you what it is and how you can achieve one. Even if you don’t like the effect, you’ll still learn something about your camera’s manual settings.

Click on the photo above to be taken to the article.

 

 

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Filed under Arches National Park, Big Bend, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon, Equipment, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Photography In The National Parks, starbursts, Zion National Park

The Beginning of Sunrise at Sunrise Point

The Beginning Of Sunrise At Sunrise Point

Even though you can capture amazing sunrises in many places within Bryce Canyon National Park, this overlook is still one of the most popular places to view the sunrise. It can get pretty crowded, even in the winter and early spring. To photograph the sunrise, you need to arrive during the pre-dawn hours, set up your tripod and wait for the light show to start. On this, my first morning in the park, the colors of the sunrise did not disappoint. I arrived about 45 minutes prior to sunrise and was the first person at the overlook.
I used my Canon 5DS and 16-35mm f2.8 Mk III lens on a tripod.  I did not use a CPL filter and, for this image, did not use a grad ND, either.
The trail you see below is the Queens Garden trail.
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under 5DS, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, Landscape, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, Spring, sunrise, Travel, Utah, Utah

A National Park Road

The Morning View Along GTTS RoadA Steaming GTTS RoadGTTS Road From Highline Trail

Roads get us to and through the national parks we love to visit, like the Going-To-The-Sun road pictured here, that bisects the park from east to west (or west to east) and takes us through some of the finest mountain scenery in the Lower 48 (imho).

Speaking of roads, if you are of a mind to read the latest national park news, such as the coming opening of the Tioga Road in Yosemite National Park, or the latest explosive activity at Kilauea in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, or where you should pitch your tent or park your RV within a national park, then go on over to the National Parks Traveler and read all about it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Canon, Glacier National Park MT, Montana, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel

Capturing Color, Pattern and Texture in your Images

Colors Textures And Layers

Layers of sunset colors, patterns and textures at Sunset Point in Bryce National Park, Utah

Back in April, the National Parks Traveler published my latest photography article, which dealt with finding color, pattern and texture in your national park images.  In the article, I described several techniques I always use when highlighting one or all three of these properties in my photos.  If you want to know more about those techniques, click on the photo above to be taken to the article.

Note:  The image above was captured with a Canon 5DSR and 24-70mm f2.8 lens at Sunset Point this past April, 2018

 

 

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Filed under Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon, National Parks Traveler, Parks, Photography, Travel, Utah

Happy Earth Day 2018!

Watching The Sunrise

Happy Earth Day to you, this April 22nd, 2018.  I feel like I experience Earth Day every time I visit a national park.  On this occasion, I was up with scads of other people at Sunrise Point in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, watching:  the sunrise.

 

 

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Filed under 5DS, 5DSR, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canon, Canon Lens, Geology, Landscape, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, Spring, sunrise, Travel, Utah, Utah

Extra! Extra! Read All About It!

Newspaper Rock From A Distance CROPNewspaper RockNewspaper Rock PetroglyphsNewspaper Rock PetroglyphsBecky At Newspaper Rock

If you happen to be traveling to the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park, in Utah, along Hwy 211 after turning off of State Hwy 191, you’ll probably pass right by this parking area (with restroom) and a very short path leading to this amazing rock panel crammed with petroglyphs in a fenced-off, quiet sheltered area. Don’t pass by this place. It’s really cool!

This spot records about 2,000 years of human activity from B.C. to A.D. 1300. I can’t find out who actually discovered this spot to make it into an archaeological site, and nobody really knows what all the petroglyphs mean. Do they represent magical symbols, map symbols, calendar events or just doodles? I noticed some current graffiti on the panel (even though the area is fenced off), and I have to tell you, the current graffiti is not half as imaginative or pretty as the ancient stuff. Just sayin’. There’s a reason this archeological site is fenced off.

I had to do a little internet searching, but it has been called a state historical monument that apparently was once part of Bears Ears National Monument, but it’s now been chopped off and is part of the Indian Creek National Monument (according to visitutah.com), located 15 miles west of U.S. Highway 191 (about 60 miles south of Moab).

What’s the difference between petroglyphs and pictographs? Well, petroglyphs are actually carved into the rock, while pictographs are painted on rock. These petroglyphs were etched into the dark rock coating called “desert varnish” to expose the light, buff-colored rock beneath. You can tell the older petroglyphs from the others because they are dark and covered with a bit of desert varnish, again.

It never ceases to amaze me how this particular rock panel was discovered among the vast and imposing mesas, buttes and canyons. If you stand on the road, you can see the panel in the distance, but only if you are really looking for it

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 24-105mm, 5DS, 5DSR, Canon, Canon Lens, Equipment, Photography, Travel, Utah, Utah