Monthly Archives: August 2018

Rootbound

Rootbound

Rootbound along the Rim Trail toward Upper Inspiration Point
Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

I’ll bet this is one of the most-photographed trees along the Rim Trail. One photographer on Flickr remarked he spent 4 hours photographing the tree/roots. Um, I did not spend that long and can’t remember the last time I stood in one place for 4 hours photographing the same stationary object. Perhaps he did exaggerate a little, but maybe not. Anyway, this tree (and others that you can find along the Rim Trail and within Bryce Amphitheater) are great examples of erosion processes there in the park. Those exposed roots were – at some point in time – once covered with soil until it was all eroded away. And yet, there stands the tree, continuing to keep a toe-hold to its survival.

The key to getting a clear shot of both tree and background is to either take two shots – one focusing on just the tree and the other focusing on the background – and blend them together (aka “focus stack”) or take a wide-angle shot and then crop to taste, which is what I did, since I was handholding the camera.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved

 

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Bryce Canyon National Park, Photography, Seasons, summer, Travel, Utah, Utah

The Armchair Photography Guide To Canyonlands National Park’s Island In The Sky District

Closeup View of Green River Scenery

Close-up detail of Green River Overlook geology, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

The National Parks Traveler just published my latest Armchair Photography Guide, which this month, deals with Canyonlands National Park’s Island In The Sky District.  No matter whether you use a smartphone, point-and-shoot, or SLR camera, if you are planning a trip to this area, you should check out the article.  Just click on the photo.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Armchair Photography Guide, Canyonlands National Park, Geology, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Photography, Travel, Utah, Utah

Plan, Think, And Don’t Be Stupid In A National Park

Hats On The Fountain Paint Pot Nature Trail

Looking at something other than the geysers in Yellowstone National Park

When we visit a national park, we know we will see some incredible beauty for which that particular park is famous.  However, we often see other things, like litter, driving faster than the posted speed limit, and poor planning regarding footwear on the trail.

I recently wrote an essay, which the National Parks Traveler published this morning, on just that sort of thing.  I hope that it’s a reminder for us all to treat our national parks better while we are guests there.

To read the story, click on the photo.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under National Parks, National Parks Traveler

Jenny Lake Scenery

Jenny Lake Scenery

There’s a reason Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, is so popular. That area possesses some stunning forest and mountain scenery, which I photographed while taking a short walk along the popular trail encompassing Jenny Lake.

Speaking of Grand Teton, the season for berries is now, and humans are allowed to pick berries in this park. Of course, there are regulations as well as harvesting devices which are prohibited, not to mention the fact that the bears are out after those berries, as well.

If you want to know more, click on this link to the article in the National Parks Traveler: https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/…/grand-teton-park-vi…

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Canon, Grand Teton National Park, National Parks, Photography, Travel, Wyoming

Grand Geyser Erupting

Grand Geyser Eruption

Grand Geyser Eruption, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
 
It’s hard not to cheer whenever a geyser erupts. You sit or stand and wait, based upon when the schedule says the geyser *might* erupt. And then, when it does, there is this powerful gush of hot, steaming water reaching high up into the sky, or covering a large swath of area around the opening. It’s evidence reminding us of the geologic forces just beneath our feet. Geysers erupting are truly amazing sights and I felt lucky enough to have witnessed three different geysers erupt on the day I visited the Upper Geyser Basin.
And, here’s a little word of advice for you:  if you are nuts enough to visit an extremely crowded place like Yellowstone National Park in the summer, then the best time for light and few crowds is the early morning, between 6am – 7:30am.  I know, not much of a window there, right?  And, you should only pick one spot at which you want to be that morning.  Because if you have in mind to concentrate on more than one spot, then you are going to have problems trying to find parking, I kid you not.
Another word of advice:  if you want to tour the visitor center in relative peace while you are at Upper Geyser Basin, then do it while the hordes are awaiting the eruption of Old Faithful.  If you wait until after the eruption, you will be elbow-to-elbow with all the crowds merging into the visitor center.
I already knew I wanted to experience all that I could around Old Faithful, so I spent the entire day at Upper Geyser Basin (where Old Faithful is located), and had a wonderful day, despite the crowds (and there were thousands of people there).
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.
A Chilly Morning At The Upper Geyser Basin
A quiet, pre-sunrise morning overlooking Old Faithful

Leave a comment

Filed under Geology, Landscape, National Parks, Photography, Travel, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Morning At Schwabacher Landing

Morning At Schwabacher Landing

A serene morning at Schwabacher Landing, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

I’m all done with my national park portion of my road trip move from Texas to Washington State.  I’ve visited 5 national parks on this trip and have come away with some stunning photos (imo).  I’m in Bozeman, Montana, visiting friends and will leave tomorrow to continue on to central Washington.  It’s been an awesome trip, so far, but I’m ready to see the end of the road (literally).

Here is an image I captured one early morning at Schwabacher Landing in Grand Teton National Park.  No visit is complete without a stop in this area.  Be warned, though.  Except for a very short portion of paved road, the rest of the route is a gravelly, bumpy, potholey drive to the parking area.  And it’s best to arrive in the morning, not only for lovely lighting but to beat the crowds (if you visit in the summer).  Do walk along the trail as far as you can, because there are many views with still water and mountain reflections all along the way.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

1 Comment

Filed under Grand Teton National Park, National Parks, Photography, Uncategorized