2020 National Park Photo Calendars

 

MORA 2020NOCA 20202020 OLYM

It’s that time of year again, folks. I’ve created three 2020 wall calendars and am working on a fourth, each centered around the national park trips I made over the course of this year. Yes, I know there are a gazillion gorgeous calendars out there. Just add mine to the pile.

What makes my calendars different from others is that many, if not most, of these photos, you’ve seen in some form or another, and you’ve read the story behind each photo, including what I was feeling at the time I captured the shot. Photography is about storytelling, and these calendars tell a story of my national park visits.

If you are interested in seeing what I have produced, click on each image above or on each calendar cover image in the left sidebar of this blog site.

Thanks!

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Filed under Calendars, Mount Rainier National Park, Mt. Rainier National Park, National Parks, North Cascades Complex, North Cascades National Park, Olympic National Park, Uncategorized

Please Take This Short Survey On National Parks Traveler

Old Faithful

Old Faithful at Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park
(Click the image to take the survey)

Hey folks, if you follow my blog posts, you know the majority of images I post are of national parks. You also know I’m a contributing photographer and editor to the National Parks Traveler, a nonprofit media site reporting on a daily basis about our national parks, national memorials, national seashores, national recreation areas, national historic sites and other protected public lands.

The Traveler has published a short survey they would like you to take, if you love reading about your favorite national parks and public lands and staying up to date on news about those lands.

In the Traveler’s own words:

“As the Internet’s only editorially independent, nonprofit news organization dedicated to covering national parks and protected areas, National Parks Traveler (NPT) produces over 1,250 stories for the public for free each year in hopes of educating, informing and stimulating important discussion and debate about how the U.S. National Park System, national parks and protected areas worldwide are managed.

As a newly established nonprofit organization, our work is funded solely by private donations and small grants. However, with 1.5 million readers world-wide, a social media footprint of more than 300,000, and an annual growth rate of roughly 9.5%, the time has come for us to take our operations and organizational maturity to the next level.

In 2019, we hope to build infrastructure and enhance our data capturing systems, so we can more effectively deliver our mission and produce a stronger community impact by increasing the quantity, quality and ethical standards of investigative reporting and watchdog journalism for national parks and protected areas.”

To take the survey, click on the image at the top.

And, Thanks!

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“Stay On Walk”

Stay On WalkIMG_3442IMG_3436

There are signs all along the boardwalks at the geyser basins telling visitors to “stay on walk,” While I didn’t see anybody actually walking off the boardwalk (there was this one moron who walked off the boardwalk to get an up-close and personal look at Old Faithful, but he did it at night and suffered bad burns for it while I was there), I did see people do stupid stuff at Norris Basin.

The first photo you see is a morning shot at Upper Geyser Basin, and I was getting an overall shot of the beautiful scene in front of me, including a leading line of the boardwalk and a portion of the sign.

The other two photos I took with my iPhone of people doing stupid stuff at Norris Basin. That first shot is of a lady from a tour bus who sat on the edge of the boardwalk and put her feet on the thin crust so her honey could get a fashionable shot of her. The second shot is of an idiot who decided to risk screwing with the delicate ecosystem there and leaned over to touch the foliage along the boardwalk. I was almost hoping he’d fall in so I could get a shot of that, too. I’m not very nice when it comes to seeing people do stuff they shouldn’t.

Another story comes to mind of a couple of friends I made while at Upper Geyser Basin. I’d hiked with them to Fairy Falls because they didn’t want me hiking alone in an area frequented by a bear. The following day, they’d walked to Morning Glory Pool (I got there a little later than they did) and they told me the story of a couple there at the pool, and the woman climbed over the fence there to squat next to the hot spring to get a photo of herself. When someone said something to her, she looked up and said “You’re not rangers.” My friends were flabbergasted. I asked them if they’d gotten a photo of that stupid creature and they said the woman quickly got her selfie and climbed back over the fence before they could get their smartphones out. Another one of those days when I wished I would have been there to get a photo and send it to the National Parks Traveler for posting as well as posting it to my own page. People don’t really realize just how thin that crust is out in the geyser basins and how hot and acidic that water really is. I read that some of the hot springs at Norris are as acidic as battery acid.

Stay On Walk, folks!

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under autumn, Canon, National Parks, Photography, Seasons, smartphone, Travel, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park

Your Armchair Photography Guide To Olympic National Park, Part 3 – The Mountains

Hurricane Ridge Landscape Pano

The National Parks Traveler has published Part 3 of my Armchair Photography Guide to Olympic National Park. Part 3 deals with traveling to and photographing the mountains of this amazing park. To read the article, click on the photo above.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 1DX Mk II, 24-105mm, 5DSR, Armchair Photography Guide, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM, Canon Lens, National Parks, National Parks Traveler, Olympic National Park, Photography, Seasons, summer, Travel, Washington State

Artist Paint Pots, Yellowstone National Park

Artist Paint Pots Geothermal Basin And Mount Holmes In The Dista

Artist Paint Pots Geothermal Basin with Mount Holmes in the distance, Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming

 
It’s a short walk along a well-trod path to get to the boardwalk beginning the loop around the Artist Paint Pots basin. As I stepped onto the boardwalk, I passed a couple of men talking to each other. Another friend approached and they told him that their wives were off looking at the sights while they remained there, since they were not that enthused about the area. Lo and behold, as I passed the men, their wives returned and one of them said sarcastically “Well, that was a blast.” They were not impressed, either.
 
I don’t know what those two couples were expecting, but I have a feeling they have not been reading my photo column in the National Parks Traveler, where I urge people to 1) keep their expectations on the low side since it’s likely they will not see exactly what they expect to see, and 2) observe what is around them. Really *look* at where they are and what they see. I am assuming that the couples, like many other people who come to this area, were a little jaded and didn’t stop to think about what they were standing upon: thin crust with a busy geothermal system beneath them. It’s amazing that we can enter a national park that is so geologically active. How many other places in the world can you see so many active geysers, hot springs and fumeroles all in one area? How many other places can you actually hear the hissing of the steam and see the bubbling water and mud pots? I know there are some, but I’ll wager not that many that you can actually get to. When you are someplace like Artist Paint Pots, you are walking beside geysers and hot springs with boiling or near-boiling water.
 
These couples probably did not appreciate the many colorful hot springs around them (hence the name “Artist Paint Pots”), or the panoramic view that included a snow-iced Mount Holmes in the far distance.
 
I brought with me the mindset of a geologist and photographer, so I saw beauty everywhere I walked in that small basin. As a matter of fact, that’s what I told a retired gentleman and his wife as he approached the trailhead, with a daughter and active 6-year old in tow. He stopped me and said: “Two questions: how far to get there and is it worth it?” I told him I thought it was worth it but I was seeing everything through a geologic and photographic background. I then told him about the reactions of those two couples. I told him that I’d also seen another couple with their 4-year old child who was managing the walk and the uphill climb to the bridge overlook (which is where I stood to take this photo) with no problems. I said to him that they’d have to judge for themselves as to whether or not the hike and the view were worth it. I certainly thought both were.
 
Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 5DSR, autumn, Canon, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III, Canon Lens, Geology, National Parks, Photography, Yellowstone National Park

Trees Along The Sol Duc Trail

Trees Along The Sol Duc Trail HDR

Yeah, I’ve been posting quite a few tree and forest interior images. It’s what you do when you visit Olympic National Park. This shot was captured during a hike along the Sol Duc Falls trail in the Sol Duc Valley. There are all sorts of lovely, deep, quiet, photo ops and the trees always look very interesting. This tall tree in front appears to be growing right out of or at least, very close to, the tree behind it, if you look closely at the root structure at the bottom of the trees.

The moral of this story is that you should observe the scenes around you and not keep your head down as you head toward your sole purpose of hiking the trail in the first place (in this case, to get to Sol Duc Falls). The more you observe, the better your compositions become.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under 24-105mm, 5DS, Canon, forest, National Parks, Olympic National Park, Photography, Seasons, summer, Travel, Washington State

Creepy

Shapes And Colors In The Rain Forest BW

I know, what a word to use for something as beautiful as the scenery along the Hall of Mosses trail in the Hoh Rain Forest of Olympic National Park. Actually, this image (just in time for Halloween, I might add), is a duplicate of the color one I uploaded to a post a couple of days ago. I wondered how forest interiors might look if converted to monochrome. I immediately noticed the clarity and texture of the tree roots, and the play of shadow and light in the scene. A lovely, green and brown serene scene became a bit more sinister in black and white.

Copyright Rebecca L. Latson, all rights reserved.

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Filed under Black & White, Halloween, HD PENTAX-DA645 28-45mm f/4.5 ED AW SR Lens, National Parks, Olympic National Park, Pentax Lens, Photography, Travel, Washington State